Longitudinal MCAT Study:  A More Effective Approach for Acing the MCAT

Longitudinal MCAT Study: A More Effective Approach for Acing the MCAT

Get Started Today Call: 888-839-9997 e-mail: info@admissionshelpers.com 20 Minutes Free Consultation     By Rohit Anand, MD The MCAT is arguably the most daunting exam in the length of medical education. The idea that an exam controls to a large degree not just where, but if, a student will be admitted to medical school is intimidating to say the least. This challenge has only increased in recent years with ever increasing averages for the MCAT for medical school admissions. Despite this, the study plan for many students has remained the same over the years, with little changes made to the classic model of a dedicated set of weeks to study for the exam.  There are multiple challenges with a dedicated study block for MCAT studying. For most students, the MCAT encompasses three or more years of undergraduate coursework from introductory biology to physics 2. Reviewing this amount of content in 2-3 months for a dedicated study window is arduous, as seen by the 62% of MCAT test takers that reported difficulty with content volume. On top of this, many individuals have to re-learn some of material that was earlier in their education adding to the review time for those subjects. This is particularly true for the ~50% of test takers who are no longer in school when taking the MCAT. Many sources online suggest a minimum of 300-400 hours of studying for the MCAT. If you divide that into a 2 to 3-month timeline, it is a significant portion of weekly hours, which is difficult for employed individuals, but also difficult for students who are focusing on other activities...